Father and son, Deran and Ron Bosshardt of Richfield, Utah thought that they had stumbled across the perfect platform for a Camaro restoration project, until they took a closer look. As usual, ’69 Camaros make up the bulk of our diet in the world of all things Chevy, and this is no less true in the case of the Bosshardts.

Their reason for wanting to find a ’69 car in particular was that they wanted to find a companion, or “stablemate” for the ’67 SS that they had already had stored in their garage.

Deran and Ron searched the web for a ’69 Camaro that would match their criteria. After a long, online search, the Bosshardts thought that they had finally found the car they were looking for in the form of a ’69 located in New York.

The web description of the Camaro seemed sufficient, and an exchange of money and ownership took place. The first-gen was brought back to Ron’s home in Utah, and as is often the case, the car itself did not seem to exactly match its online description.

The prospect of buying the early pony seemed like a perfect one for Ron and son, Deran, as the car featured a 350 intact with a recently overhauled, Mark IV 427 being thrown-in as part of the transaction.

The 427 platform, especially in light of being stuffed into the subframe of an early Camaro, seemed like a muscle car dream come true. Upon closer inspection, however, metal shavings in the engine’s oil pan were discovered, and a crack in the Mark IV block deemed the 427 for the engine “ground file.” No longer able to use their old-school, 427 mill, Ron and Deran decided to start their Camaro from scratch.

The Bosshardts started to create what has been called a “full-out restomod super Camaro,” entrusting the intricate task of the car’s bodywork to Ryan Lee of Darkside Rides in Richfield. Lee was entrusted with the task of bringing the Camaro body as close to as-new condition as possible.

But the cornerstone of the Bosshardts’ Camaro is in the pro-touring perfection of its build, and modern sports car driving dynamics were of concern in its construction. For this reason, Lee and Darkside Rides have constructed underneath the Camaro a full-length, Schwartz modified tube chassis with a triangulated, 4-link rear suspension.

With the car’s vintage 427 mill now long since scrapped, Ron and Deran gave whatever engine parts they had over to builder Steve Flatt, who added a few parts of his own. The result was a 496 big block with immense torque, and with a suspension setup consisting of QA1 coilovers, NASCAR style sway bars and drop spindles, it’s no wonder that the Bosshardts’ Camaro has been heralded by this slideshow as nothing short of auto architecture.